Refugee kids

Connect Your Kids to Refugee Children

June 23, 2017By Linsly, Founder

Pursuing Dreams -- Build Compassion in Kids Through Refugee's Stories

 

This June 20th we observed World Refugee Day.

Over the past months, our kids have had a myriad of questions about refugees. 

  • How does someone become a refugee?
  • What do you do when you come to a host nation?
  • Do you ever get to go back to your home?
  • Why are there refugee camps?
  • Who decides when you can leave?

And, more ...

 

For help we turned to our friend and expert, Tenley Harrison, who works with Refugee Transitions.

 

Refugee Transitions video on YouTube
 

Watch a powerful 12-minute video with the personal stories of kids helped by Refugee Transitions

 

 

Refugee Transitions works with post-resettlement refugees and immigrants in the Bay Area to teach English and the life skills they'll need to thrive in the U.S. Tenley shared inspiring stories of refugees with our family. This connection to real kids living right here in our area helped foster additional compassion and empathy in my own kids.

 

Three child refugees

We got to know the personal stories of Fatuma, Win and Jyoti, three refugee children successfully resettled here in California.

 

Ready to dig a little deeper?

Tenley hand-picked titles for you to recommend to the young adults in your life interested in learning more about refugees (and for you as well!).

She also worked with media titles suited for PreK and Elementary aged kiddos. The culmination of their work can be explored in our Refugee-Focused Playlist for Kids.

 


 

Inspired to help? Support The Women's Initiative

 

Refugee Transitions is embarking on a new program, that specifically targets assistance and empowerment for mothers and children who are new to this country.

To increase their impact to reach more women and deliver daily education programs to them and their children donate any amount here.

Photo of four refugee children

Young children routinely experience forced migration due to war, violence, or economic duress. 

 

 

Thank you,

Linsly & Tenley